Smaller and Smarter Pumps Change Infusion Market

Smaller and Smarter Pumps Change Infusion Market

 More is expected from the infusion pump these days, as our recent report on this area describes.  Updates on patients? Warnings on medication error? Today’s pumps can handle it. Infusion pumps have a variety of functions from providing essential fluids, eternal feeding or specialty functions such as insulin delivery.   New ‘smart’ infusion pump devices that can assist healthcare professionals in patient care through computer algorithms, warning features and connectivity are leading growth in the $7 billion-dollar world market for infusion devices.   Many have medication error prevention, and some models are now providing a real-time infusion status for the patient’s EMR.

Among the interesting pump models:
CareFusion’s Alaris system is designed with connectivity options for Cerner and Epic EMR platforms.
Baxter’s Spectrum infusion pumps have technology to aid in safe infusion with multiple medication error prevention systems.
B. Braun’s Outlook ES Safety Infusion system utilizes bar codes for several aspects of operation such as requiring two medical personnel to scan their ID badges in order to administer high-risk medications.
Hospira Plum A+ are able to integrate with current EMR systems through the company’s IV Clinical Integration Solution.

Kalorama Informatin’s recent report, The World Market for Infusion Pumps (Large Volume Pumps, Ambulatory Pumps, Insulin Pumps, Enteral Feeding Pumps, Others) contains further segment market analysis, company profiles and discussions of key trends. The report can be found at: http://www.kaloramainformation.com/Worldwide-Infusion-Pumps-7961675/

But pumps aren’t only getting smarter; they are getting smaller as well.  A recent article inMD+DI discusses the micropumps that are populating wearable devices these days.  With the trend toward miniaturization, today’s pumps have a very flat design and can be much less expensive than previous-generation pumps,” remarks Seta Davidian, marketing manager at Lexington, MA-based Servoflo Corp., which markets the mp6 diaphragm micropump from Dortmund, Germany-based Bartels Mikrotechnik GmbH. “The mp6 transports tiny amounts of gases or liquids in drug-delivery and infusion-pump applications. Aside from its size, the pump’s chief technological advantage is that it is easy to control. If an end-user needs to specify different variables, the pump can accommodate this.” Though small, some can pump an impressive rate of flow.

 With the trend toward miniaturization, today’s pumps have a very flat design and can be much less expensive than previous-generation pumps,” remarks Seta Davidian, marketing manager at Lexington, MA-based Servoflo Corp., which markets the mp6 diaphragm micropump from Dortmund, Germany-based Bartels Mikrotechnik GmbH. “The mp6 transports tiny amounts of gases or liquids in drug-delivery and infusion-pump applications. Aside from its size, the pump’s chief technological advantage is that it is easy to control. If an end-user needs to specify different variables, the pump can accommodate this.”  -MD+DI