Superbug Raises Device and Facility HAI Concerns

Superbug Raises Device and Facility HAI Concerns

In terms of prevention for healthcare associated infections (HAI), it’s notable that the market for facillity sterilization is just over 3.1 billion dollars but the market to treat them is much larger at 10 billion.   Ideally, the market for treatment should shrink as prevention grows. This may happen, and prevention may become more of a focus now, with the recent superbug concern at UCLA Medical Center.  180 patients may have been exposed to a CRE (carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae) threat, and 2 deaths are linked to the outbreak.  The recent exposure to CRE is thought to be a result of a mostly routine endoscopic procedure. Kalorama covered HAI markets for treatment, testing and prevention in a recent report.  

For the past 60 years, antibiotic drugs have turned bacterial infections into treatable conditions rather than the life-threatening scourges they once were. However, the effectiveness of many antibiotics is waning dramatically, as more and more types of bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. Growing antibiotic resistance is forcing the industry to re-evaluate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment plans for patients in hospitals and other health facilities. The incidence of drug-resistant infections is on the rise and without aggressive infection control plans in place it can be expected to accelerate in the future.

 On Thursday, the FDA issued a safety communication focusing on proper cleaning of the specific type of endoscope used, duodenoscope, and the design complexity which may impede effective reprocessing of the device.  The FDA has announced that from January 2013 through December 2014 a total of 75 reports were made to the administration, involving 135 patients in the U.S., for possible microbial transmission from reprocessed duodenoscopes.  The most recent event in California involves an additional 100+ patients.

A growing list of treatment-resistant bacteria has surfaced in the medical community.  CRE is a highly drug resistant family of germs which has recently caused concern in the medical community around the world.  Some reports suggest CRE is resistant to most antibiotics and may cause death in up to 50% of infected patients. 

Effective reprocessing of reusable medical devices requires diligent cleaning and processing procedures which include recommendations from the FDA, CDC and the manufactures of these devices.  In the case of duodenoscopes, Fujifilm, Olympus and Pentax are the three largest manufacturers marketing these devices.  Additional precautions can be implemented to ensure patients are at the lowest risk possible for coming in contact with pathogens.  Sterilizing and disinfecting the reprocessing equipment, instruments in the health facility, the equipment, furniture, and all areas of patient and healthcare worker contact provide the best approach to preventing the spread of infection.  This in combination with proper hand washing techniques and procedures, screening and diagnosing, using low-risk equipment all play a vital role in this fight.  The Kalorama Information report,Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI) Control Markets, addresses the market opportunities for controlling infections in the health facility and focuses on resistant health infections such as CRE.

The report can be found athttp://www.kaloramainformation.com/Healthcare-Associated-Infection-8143524/

Nearly 180 patients at UCLA’s Ronald Reagan Medical Center may have been exposed to potentially deadly bacteria from infected duodenoscopes, and two deaths are linked to the outbreak.  The recent exposure to CRE is thought to be a result of a mostly routine endoscopic procedure.  On Thursday, the FDA issued a safety communication focusing on proper cleaning of the specific type of endoscope used, the duodenoscope, and the design complexity which may impede effective reprocessing of the device.  The FDA has announced that from January 2013 through December 2014 a total of 75 reports were made to the administration, involving 135 patients in the U.S., for possible microbial transmission from reprocessed duodenoscopes.  The most recent event in California involves an additional 100+ patients.

 A growing list of treatment-resistant bacteria has surfaced in the medical community.  CRE is a highly drug resistant family of germs which has recently caused concern in the medical community around the world.  Some reports suggest CRE is resistant to most antibiotics and may cause death in up to 50% of infected patients. 

Effective reprocessing of reusable medical devices requires diligent cleaning and processing procedures which include recommendations from the FDA, CDC and the manufactures of these devices. Additional precautions can be implemented to ensure patients are at the lowest risk possible for coming in contact with pathogens.  Sterilizing and disinfecting the reprocessing equipment, instruments in the health facility, the equipment, furniture, and all areas of patient and healthcare worker contact provide the best approach to preventing the spread of infection.  This in combination with proper hand washing techniques and procedures, screening and diagnosing, using low-risk equipment all play a vital role in this fight. 

The Kalorama Information report,Healthcare Associated Infection (HAI) Control Markets, addresses the market opportunities for controlling infections in the health facility and focuses on resistant health infections such as CRE.  The report can be obtained athttp://www.kaloramainformation.com/Healthcare-Associated-Infection-8143524/