Five Things to Know About the Vaccine Industry in 2016

Five Things to Know About the Vaccine Industry in 2016

The vaccine market continued its growth and innovation in 2016.     Merck, Sanofi Pasteur, Pfizer, Glaxo Smith Kline and CSL are among the top companies in the market.  Segment growth, the growing obesity challenge and delivery systems were among the trends noted this year.  Kalorama has studied vaccine markets for a decade, and this year published its report Vaccines 2016.  The report is available at: http://www.kaloramainformation.com/Vaccines-9944129/

Kalorama noted the following important trends in vaccines in 2016:

  1. Revenues Grew, Again:  In 2016 the world market for preventive vaccines totaled $29.3 billion, up from $24.7 billion in 2014 as sales in all segments expanded. The world vaccines market is predicted to increase 6-8% a year as new product introductions continue and usage of current products expands further.  
  1. Pediatrics Grew Faster Than Adult Vaccines:  Sales of pediatric vaccines are expected to increase at a faster pace than adult vaccines but just slightly.  Pediatric vaccines constitute the larger market, accounting for 57.6% of the total vaccines market in 2016. 
  1. The United States Leads:  Vaccines are a priority in developed Western nations and the market reflects this.  On a regional basis, the United States comprises the single largest market for pediatric and adult vaccines combined, accounting for 34.6% of the overall market with sales of $10 billion. The European Union is presently the second largest global vaccine market.   Emerging markets will continue to grow slightly in proportion in 2017. 
  1. Obesity and Vaccines a Concern:  Aside from being associated with a broad range of serious co-morbidities including arthritis, asthma, cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, gastrointestinal disease, hypertension, kidney disease, pain and sleeping disorders, obesity has recently been linked to reduced effectiveness of vaccines. In a recent study of 22 obese teenagers conducted at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, researchers found that the standard one-inch injection needle spurred only a weak response to hepatitis B vaccine while a 1.5 inch needle provided a higher antibody count. As longer needles are not routinely used for vaccinations and many healthcare professionals are not aware of the limitations of shorter needles, this presents a potentially significant public health risk due to the likelihood of similar limitations with other vaccines and rising rates of obesity. 

    In a recent study of 22 obese teenagers conducted at Baylor College of Medicine in Texas, researchers found that the standard one-inch injection needle spurred only a weak response to hepatitis B vaccine while a 1.5 inch needle provided a higher antibody count. As longer needles are not routinely used for vaccinations and many healthcare professionals are not aware of the limitations of shorter needles, this presents a potentially significant public health risk due to the likelihood of similar limitations with other vaccines and rising rates of obesity.
  1. Innovation in Delivery Paramount:  There are a number of problems with parenteral vaccine delivery beyond the pain of injections and fear of needles that many people, both young and old, experience.   Needles and syringes are expensive, and trained support personnel are required to administer vaccinations. Pain and expense aside, injections do not always do an adequate job of conferring immunity. 

    Mucosal Delivery is one of the methods companies have developed to circumvent this.    Research has shown that mucosally administered antigens can stimulate a vigorous systemic immune response against pathogens whose route of entry and mode of pathogenicity is not the stomach.  

    A growing number of companies are active in this area including Soligenix and Mymetics.  Soligenix has completed a Phase I clinical trial for RiVax, its ricin toxin vaccine which provides protection against a category B biothreat (ricin), and has begun another Phase Ib study. The program is being funded by grants from NIH, which have totaled over $15 million in direct funding to the company. As of early 2016, clinical testing was ongoing, supported by a grant from the FDA’s Orphan Products Division. 

    Transcutaneous, Vaccine Patches and Intranasal are other elievery methods that have shown positive development. 

Kalorama Information’s Vaccines 2016 contains market estimates, company profiles, trends, competitive analysis and other information about the vaccine industry.  The report is available at:http://www.kaloramainformation.com/Vaccines-9944129/.