Enabling Technologies in Drug Discovery Research Package

 
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Published Sep 1, 2002 | 564 Pages | Pub ID: KLI826671

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Kalorama's Proteomics 50: Competing Technologies & Alliances in an Emerging Industry
November 2001

Abstract
:
With the Human Genome Project in its culminating phase, scientists are turning to the task of converting the soon to be completed DNA sequence into information that will improve human medicine and health care. One of the key challenges ahead is understanding how proteins direct biological functions. Proteomics, the science of the cellular protein universe, attempts to catalog and characterize proteins, compare variations in their expression levels under different conditions (i.e., various stages of disease compared with nondisease states), study their interactions, and identify their functional roles. However, these studies will not produce a complete "proteome," or a map of an organism, because cells are always changing, as is protein expression. Scientists believe there is a powerful distinction to be made between the molecular function of an isolated protein and the function of that protein in the complex cellular environment.

The goals of proteomics in medicine are to provide the ability to predict rather than confirm disease and to construct a new, systematic way to discover drugs. A preliminary step in achieving these goals requires that researchers acquire or invent the technology to fit its aspirations. Several approaches are being studied including structural genomics, a branch of proteomics, which studies the shapes of proteins with the goal of constructing a lexicon as well as an understanding of where in the body different proteins are produced, and how each is controlled. One molecular biologist, Richard Burgess of the McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research at the University of Wisconsin, defines the scope of proteomics as "a grab bag of activities that are all in the postgenomics or functional genomics area, or the what-do-we-need-to-know-to-make-sense-of-all-the-genomics-data arena."

Proteomics is not the study of proteins one by one, as has been done traditionally, but in an automated, large-scale manner that requires new technologies and techniques. Proteomics includes not only the identification and quantification of proteins, but also the determination of their localization, modifications, interactions, activities, and, ultimately, their function. Considerable effort is currently being devoted to the development of novel technologies to unravel the mystery of proteins.

Companies competing in the proteomics space offer technology platforms for discovering or screening drug candidates or diagnostic markers. One of the ways emerging proteomics companies fund their enterprises, is selling their services to the pharmaceutical industry through an wide array of alliances and collaborations. This report will examine competing technologies, and the alliances being formed in the proteomics arena today.

Perspectives and Profiles in Research Informatics and Systems Biology
September 2002

Abstract:

The informatics landscape is a difficult one to map. Competing suppliers, technologies, and architectures make the field confusing enough, but how informatics will ultimately shape the process of drug discovery—and indeed, the clinical practice of medicine—is an even larger question. Call it research informatics, systems biology, or bio-IT, the siliconization of the life sciences is a movement not yet fully understood.

That’s why Kalorama is taking a step back and letting leading figures in the informatics landscape ruminate on how things are shaping up. In this new sourcebook on informatics, nine thought leaders from industry, academia, and the government provide their insights, in their own words, on everything from the emerging role of the laboratorian to the necessity computing power to the new frontier of personalized medicine.

We’ve combined these individual perspectives with profiles of the top 25 companies competing in the informatics space. Each profile provides contact information, recent revenue information, core technology, key alliances, current products, pipeline products, and a strategic summary of the company’s position and outlook.

Although somewhat different from our usual comprehensive market research study, we believe that this sourcebook will enable forward-looking executives get a handle on how informatics is progressing as an industry and how it will impact the future of medicine.

Automated Compound Storage and Retrieval
September 2002

Abstract:

Fortunately, some of the same creative suppliers that pioneered HTS and ultra-HTS have begun addressing these problems. Specialty suppliers have come up with their own solutions. These range from simple, semi-automated storage boxes to totally integrated, room-sized, multi-million dollar systems. Pharma companies are pushing suppliers for better solutions. This has created a lively and dynamic market.

Automated Compound Storage and Retrieval is the first market research study to address this vital and growing marketplace. The primary audience for the report will be marketing and product planning people at companies providing products for automated compound storage and retrieval (ACSR). However, it will also be useful to companies considering entering this field, start-ups with potentially unique products and capabilities in this area and for pharma and biotech companies struggling with the issues of compound management.

The study was designed to answer the following questions about the world market for ACSR products:

  • What are the problems and issues relating to compound storage and retrieval?
  • How are these problems and issues affecting the success of HTS programs?
  • What are some examples of ACSR solutions that have been advanced?
  • How have big pharma companies utilized these solutions?
  • What is big pharma looking for when designing a ACSR system?
  • What types of ACSR products have suppliers made available?
  • Who are the major suppliers of these products, and how are they shaping the market?
  • What is the size of the market? Market growth? Major segments?
  • What are the major unmet needs in ACSR? What opportunities do these needs create?
  • What does the future hold for ACSR?

Kalorama's Proteomics: Competing Technologies & Alliances in an Emerging Industry
November 2001

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: Executive Summary

    Scope and Methodology
    Proteomics and Genomics
    Proteomics and Bioinformatics
    Challenges Facing Proteomics Research
    • The Magnitude and Complexity of the Task
    • Proteomics Data are Increasing Exponentially
    • Technological Challenges
    • Increasing Need for Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations

    Proteomics Technologies
    • Protein Separation
    • Mass Spectrometry
    • Protein Chip Technology
    • Protein Function Studies
    • Bioinformatics

    Proteomics Technology Applications and Potential Markets
    • Proteomics in Perspective
    • Proteomics Technology Applications

    Markets for Proteomics Technologies
    Pharmaceutical Industry Trends
    Healthcare Trends
    Competitors in Proteomics
    Funding Sources for Proteomics
    • Proteomics Startups Attract Venture Capital
    • Federal Funding for Proteomics Institutes and Research Centers

Chapter 2: Introduction

    Biological Research in the Post-Genomic Era
    Proteomics and Genomics
    Proteomics and Bioinformatics
    Challenges Facing Proteomics Research
    • The Magnitude and Complexity of the Task
    • Proteomics Data are Increasing Exponentially
    • Technological Challenges
    • Increasing Need for Interdisciplinary Research Collaborations

Chapter 3: Proteomics Technologies

    Overview
    Principal Steps in Protein Analysis
    • Protein Separation
    • Protein Identification and Characterization
    • Protein Chip Technology

    Protein Function Studies
    • Protein-Protein Interactions
    • Interaction Mapping and Analysis

    Bioinformatics
    • Large Scale Databases

Chapter 4: Technology Applications and Potential Markets

    Proteomics in Perspective
    Proteomics Technology Applications
    • Basic Biological Research
    • Disease Markers for Diagnostics and Therapeutic Drug Discovery
    • Proteins as Biomarkers
    • Proteomics in Drug Discovery

    Markets for Proteomics Technologies
    • Proteomics Technologies Market Value
    • Pharmaceutical Industry Trends
    • Healthcare Trends

    Competitive Landscape
    Funding Sources for Proteomics
    • Proteomics Startups Attract Venture Capital
    • Federal Funding for Proteomics Institutes and Research Centers

Chapter 5: Kalorama's Proteomics 50: Company Profiles

    Activx Biosciences Inc.
    AlphaGene Inc.
    Applied Biosystems Group
    Archemix Corporation
    Athersys Incorporated
    AxCell Biosciences Corporation
    Beyond Genomics Incorporated
    Biacore International AB
    Caliper Technologies
    Caprion Pharmaceuticals Inc.
    Ciphergen Biosystems, Inc.
    Compugen Ltd.
    CuraGen Corporation
    DoubleTwist Incorporated
    Exelixis Incorporated
    GPC Biotech AG
    Geneva Bioinformatics SA (GeneBio)
    GeneData Incorporated
    GeneProt Incorporated
    Genomic Solutions Incorporated
    Hybrigenics SA
    Incyte Genomics Incorporated
    Inpharmatica Ltd
    Integrative Proteomics, Inc.
    Large Scale Biology Corporation
    LigoCyte Pharmacuticals, Inc.
    LumiCyte Incorporated
    Lynx Therapeutics Incorporated
    MDS Proteomics Incorporated
    MediChem Life Sciences
    Molecular Staging Incorporated
    Myriad Genetics Incorporated
    NeoGenesis Incorporated
    Novalon Pharmaceutical Corporation
    Odyssey Pharmaceuticals Incorporated
    Oxford Glycosciences
    Pepscan Systems
    Phylos Incorporated
    Protein Pathways Incorporated
    Proteome Systems Limited
    ProteoMetrics, Inc
    Protiveris Incorporated
    Rigel Pharmaceuticals Incorporated
    Sense Proteomic Limited
    SYNX Pharma Incorporated
    Syrrx Incorporated
    WITA Proteomics AG
    Xencor Incorporated
    Xerion Pharmaceuticals GmbH
    Zyomyx Incorporated

Appendix--Company Index

List of Exhibits

    Table 3-1: Top Protein Separation Technologies
    Table 3-2: Top Protein Identification and Characterization Technologies
    Table 3-3: Top Protein Chip Technology
    Table 3-4: Top Technologies in Protein Function Studies
    Table 3-5: Selected Databases Available for Proteomics Research
    Table 4-1: Kalorama's Proteomics 50 in Collaborations with Pharmaceutical Companies
    Figure 3-1: Proteomics Toolbox Technologies
    Figure 4-1: Value of Proteomics Technologies, 2001-2006

Perspectives and Profiles in Research Informatics and Systems Biology
September 2002

Table of Contents

Part I: Perspectives

    The Right Stuff
    • Gary Skuse, Director of Bioinformatics, Rochester Institute of Technology

    The Emergence of Biology and Medicine as Information-Based Sciences

    • George Poste, CEO of Health Technology Networks, former CSO, SmithKline Beecham

    Big Blue: The Great Facilitator

    • Jeffrey Augen, Director of Business Development, IBM Life Sciences

    Preparing for a More Personalized Approach to Medicine

    • Kathryn C. Zoon, PhD, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food & Drug Administration

    The Power of Systems Biology

    • Leroy Hood, MD, President, Director, and Founding Member, Institute for Systems Biology

    The Future of Medicine

    • Michael Bevilacqua, MD, PhD, CEO, Source Precision Medicine

    Integrating Functional Proteomics

    • Michael Becker, Interim CEO, AxCell Biosciences

    Merck’s Longtime Commitment to Bioinformatics

    • Richard A. Blevins, Director of Informatics Worldwide, Merck & Co.

    Back to the Future

    • Stephen Lincoln, Executive VP, Product Development, and CSO, InforMax

Part II: Profiles

  • ACLARA Biosciences, Inc.
  • Affymetrix, Inc.
  • Applied Biosystems Group
  • Caliper Technologies Corporation
  • Celera Genomics Group
  • Cellomics
  • Ciphergen Biosystems, Inc.
  • Gene Logic, Inc.
  • Human Genome Sciences, Inc.
  • Incyte Genomics
  • InforMax, Inc.
  • Integrated Genomics7
  • Lexicon Genetics Incorporated
  • LION bioscience AG
  • Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
  • Orchid BioSciences, Inc.
  • Packard BioScience
  • Phase-1 Molecular Toxicology, Inc.
  • Spotfire, Inc.
  • Sun Microsystems Life Sciences Group
  • Tripos, Inc.
  • Vertex Pharmaceuticals, Inc.



Automated Compound Storage & Retrieval
September 2002

Table of Contents


Executive Summary

    Objectives & Structure of This Report
    • Objectives
    • Report Contents and Structure

    Summary of Key Findings

    • Market History & Characteristics
    • Product Categories & Leading Suppliers
    • Market Size & Growth
    • Trends, Issues & Opportunities

Issues and Approaches

    Issues and Requirements

    ACSM Approaches by Big Pharma

    • Astra Zeneca
    • Aventis
    • Merck
    • Pfizer
    • Wyeth

    Approaches by Small Pharmas & Biotech

    • Case 1: Biotech
    • Case 2: Small Pharma
    • Case 3: Mid-Sized Pharma

    Summary of Approaches

Automated Storage & Management Markets

    Large Compound Storage Units
    • Leading Suppliers & Products
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Size, Growth, Shares

    Mid-Sized Storage Units

    • Leading Suppliers and Products
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Size, Growth, Shares

    Compound Management Products

    • Leading Suppliers and Products
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Size, Growth, Shares

Support Products for ACSM

    Compound Management Software
    • Leading Suppliers & Products
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Size, Growth, and Shares

    Automated Liquid Handling

    • Leading Suppliers and Products
    • Market Drivers
    • Market Size, Growth, Shares

    Consumables

    • Leading Suppliers & Products

Opportunities

    Customer Needs & Wants

    Breakthrough Products

    • Biophile ULT Automated Sample Storage System
    • Boston Innovation’s SmartPlate
    • Tomtec’s MicroTape System

    Trends and Future of ACSR

Supplier Profiles

    Accelrys
    • Company Focus & Ownership
    • Financials
    • Cheminformatics Products
    • Software for ACSM

    BD Biosciences

    • Company Size & Structure
    • Financials
    • BD Labware Major Products
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Beckman Coulter

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials
    • Drug Discovery Products
    • Library Management Systems for ACSM

    Biophile, Inc.

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACS
    • ACSM Technologies & Product

    Boston Innovation

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    ChemNavigator

    • Company Size & Structure
    • Major Products
    • ACSM Products

    Corning Life Sciences

    • Company Size & Structure
    • Major Products
    • ACSR Technologies & Products

    FCG Group

    • Company Focus & Structure
    • Major Products
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Hudson Control Group

    • Company Management & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Jouan Robotics S.A.

    • Company History & Structure
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Product

    MatriCal

    • About the Company
    • Major Products
    • Products for ACSM

    MDL Information Systems

    • Company History & Structure
    • Major Products
    • Featured Software Products for ACSM

    Micronic BV

    • Company Structure & Focus
    • Major Products

    Nalge Nunc International

    • Company History & Structure
    • Major Nunc Products
    • ACSM Products

    PerkinElmer

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials
    • LH Products Used in ACSM

    REMP AG

    • Company Management & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    RTS Life Science

    • Company Management & Structure
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Products

    SciQuest

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSR Technologies & Products

    Tecan AG

    • Company Structure
    • Major Products for Drug Discovery
    • ACSM Products

    The Automation Partnership (TAP)

    • Company History & Structure
    • Financials & Ownership
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Tek Cel

    • Company History & Goals
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Tomtec

    • Company History & Structure
    • Focus on ACSM
    • ACSM Products

    The Technology Partnership (TTP)

    • Company History & Structure
    • TTP Healthcare Products
    • ACSM Technologies & Products

    Xyntek

    • Company History & Approach
    • ACSM Products

    Zymark

    • Company History & Focus
    • Major Products
    • Products for ACSM

Company Directory

List of Exhibits

  • Table 1-1: Market Size and Growth in ACSM Products, 2001-2005
  • Table 1-2: Leading ACSM Suppliers, 2001
  • Table 1-3: ACSM Sales by Geographic Region, 2001
  • Table 2-1: Comparison of ACSM Configurations
  • Table 2-2: Comparison of ACSM Performance Criteria
  • Table 3-1: Large Storage Unit Market Size and Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 3-2: Mid-Sized Storage Unit Market Size and Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 3-3: Compound Management Products Market Size and
  • Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 4-1: Compound Management Software Market Size and
  • Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 4-2: Automated Liquid Handling Market Size and Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 4-3: ACSR Consumables Market Size and Growth, 2001-2005
  • Table 5-1: ACSM Trends and Impact
  • Table 6-1: Summary of Companies Involved in ACSR—Affiliations, Revenues, and Product Areas

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